See below our database of recently published news, research on driving distractions and mobile phone use.

 

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Sad, angry drivers have 10 times greater crash risk, says Virginia study

Drivers increase their crash risk by nearly ten times if they drive while angry, sad, crying or emotionally agitated, according to new research from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI).
10/06/16

Mobile phone drivers 'not linked' to accident figures

Researchers have found no link between the number of US drivers making phone calls while on the road and the number of accidents recorded.
26/09/13

ACRS study finds children in cars are more distracting than mobiles

A study published in the Australasian College of Road Safety journal in May 2012, has found kids are 12 times more distracting than other potential sources of distractions, such as mobile phones.
26/09/13

Impact of Hand-Held and Hands-Free Cell Phone Use on Driving Performance

Talking on a cell phone, of any type, was not associated with an increased safety-critical event risk. Visual-manual subtasks (such as dialing) performed on a handheld cell phone were associated with an increased (crash) risk and significantly increased the percentage of time drivers took their eyes off the forward roadway.
26/09/13

Distracted Driving Among Newly Licensed Teens

Electronic device use and other distracted driving behaviors were strongly associated with teens looking away from the roadway. Females were twice as likely as males to be using an electronic device.
26/09/13
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